• LinkedIn
  • Fresh Traffic on Google Plus
  • Subcribe to Our RSS Feed
Browsing "Google"

Marketing in the era of Google, Viral and Search Marketing

Nov 24, 2007   //   by freshtraffic   //   Google, internet marketing, online advertising  //  Comments Off

As anyone who has a product they can sell through a website will know, Marketing plays a vital part in reaching out to an audience. It’s all very well having the best product in the world, but if no-one knows about it, it’s not going to sell. Marketing, including Internet Marketing, is the best way to address this problem.

Marketers need to identify the needs and desires of consumers, and then to raise awareness of a product that will be useful or desirable for them. Essentially, marketing is a means of recruiting new customers and retaining existing ones – and in today’s fast-changing retail world, it is quite simply critical.

Internet marketing

The internet provides a ready-made audience of millions, but marketers need to take the correct steps in order to put their product before them. Website owners have an advantage in that online audiences are growing, while newspapers, radio and (to a lesser degree) TV are in decline.

This is illustrated by the fact that Google recently overtook ITV1 in terms of advertising revenues. Figures from the search engine showed that it made £327 million in advertising for the July to September period, as opposed to the £317 million made by the TV channel.

Another key benefit is that smaller businesses can effectively compete with larger companies using internet marketing, because they don’t need a huge budget for an expensive print media or billboard campaign.

But how do small businesses and other webmasters take advantage?

Search engine marketing

One tried-and-tested method is search engine marketing. This can include search engine optimization (SEO), whereby websites are boosted in Google, Yahoo, etc by containing more relevant keywords and fresh, ever-changing content, as well as through Link Building.

As the BBC notes, “one of the most important factors in deciding how relevant particular sites are is to count how many other sites link to it”, and responsible link building increases a site’s credibility.

Paid search is also popular, with companies bidding on certain keywords and having their ads displayed at the side or the top of the main results pages of the search engines.

Viral marketing

Finally, a fast-evolving method is viral marketing,
whereby social networks are used to spread awareness of a brand or product, in a self-replicating way similar to the spread of a virus.
The internet is particularly well-suited to this process because of the popularity of social networking sites such as Facebook, and because of the emerging trend for other collaborative projects and spaces.

A recent example was the Guinness viral campaign that trailed the launch of its latest television ad.

The Google PageRank Update

Oct 28, 2007   //   by freshtraffic   //   Google, internet news, pagerank, website principles  //  Comments Off

Mayhem breaks out as Google updates its PageRank, Yes a few sites have lost a few digits off the little bar, but some have gained.

Yes it seems to be aimed at websites Google thinks sells links and passes juice, what is the big deal?

Remember once upon a time I was the Googleman, only my signature, a promise, high court injunction and a few $$$ to keep my mouth shut for a few years kept me quite on revealing the SECRETS.

Whatever, PageRank is nice to have, BUT is it the be all and end all, NO.

I have had sites listing #1 for years with a PR2 and only got that through DMOZ, SERPS is what counts, no secrets, good content that is relevant, good internal linking and a few good inbound links should see you list.

Anyway back to the latest update, SERPS have been affected this time, especially if you have links from sites google has penalized, I am sure these will surface over the next week or so, I am seeing these now on a few websites already, no doubt we will have blogs and stories and screams about this next week.

Get it straight, Its not against the rules to buy links, if you buy for the right reason, traffic and not trying to shaft Google for PR or better SERPS, if you do then expect to suffer the rath of the BigG.

Google offers internet marketers keyword diagnosis

Oct 28, 2007   //   by freshtraffic   //   Google, internet marketing, payperclick  //  Comments Off

Google AdWords has received an upgrade to give its users a more “detailed breakdown” of how their keywords are performing.

Internet marketers using the ad-serving platform can now look deeper into the quality score figure for each keyword to find out if it can be improved, according to the official Inside AdWords blog.

“Specifically, you’ll learn how keyword quality and landing page quality are performing and receive recommendations for improvement,” said Inside AdWords ‘crew’ member Trevor on the blog.

The service upgrade also includes a prediction of how changes to settings or keywords can affect the visibility of ads.

According to the Google blog, advertisers will receive an alert if any of their keywords are under-performing and be offered advice on how to change this, as well as being able to view information such as their minimum bid for the keyword and an overall quality score rating.

Google AdWords deals with pay-per-click (PPC) adverts which are distributed to websites across the internet depending on the keywords selected by the internet marketer.

These advertising services are one method of link building, which can improve the performance of a website by attracting more users

Mobile Phone Blogger Jaiku Acquired by Google

Oct 10, 2007   //   by freshtraffic   //   Google, internet news  //  Comments Off

A little known Finland-based company Jaiku has just been acquired by Google.

Jaiku describes their main goal as “to bring people closer together by enabling them to share their activity streams.”

Basically Jaiku offers mobile phone software which enables users to microblog from both their mobile phone and the internet.

Google has already acquired another mobile phone software company, Zingku, who aim to provide mobile phone users with a range of services including sharing photos, posts and special Zingku “mobile flyers”.

Back in 2005, Google acquired a company called Dodgeball, but after no significant investment by Google the Dodgeball founders left their own company disappointed and frustrated.

All this activity has led to speculation by one industry analyst that Google’s rival, Yahoo may take an interest in Jaiku’s rival, Twitter.

In any case the collective acquisitions indicate that Google certainly seems to have taken a strong interest in the future of internet compatible mobile phone software.
Appropriately, both Google and Jaiku have blogged about the acquisition.

The Jaiku team state that new user sign-ups have been temporarily limited whilst Google and Jaiku engineers work together to produce a new, better service.

Google product manager, Tony Hsieh, writes that they are “excited about helping drive the next round of developments in web and mobile technology.”

Tony ends by extending a “hearty Google welcome to Jaiku”, but we will have to wait and see whether this really does materialise in innovative development or ends in development stagnation just like Dodgeball.

Busting some SEO myths

Aug 12, 2007   //   by freshtraffic   //   Google, internet news  //  Comments Off

1. Google indexes a website if you add a Google Analytics code. Busted!
2. Google indexes a website if you use Google AdWords. Busted!
3. Google indexes a website if you add Google AdSense. Busted!
4. Google indexes a page that can only be reached through nofollow links. Busted!
5. Google indexes a page that is excluded by robots.txt. Plausible!?!

Google Breaks Own Guidelines – Sells Links for $1,995

Jun 14, 2007   //   by freshtraffic   //   Google, internet news, website principles  //  Comments Off

Google, Google, Google… what am I going to do with you? As most of you know, Google recently updated their Webmaster Guidelines, including a new page on why one should report paid links to Google. The new page included this snippet :

However, some SEOs and webmasters engage in the practice of buying and selling links, disregarding the quality of the links, the sources, and the long-term impact it will have on their sites. Buying links in order to improve a site’s ranking is in violation of Google’s webmaster guidelines and can negatively impact a site’s ranking in search results.

So, one would expect Google to abide by their own rules and guidelines right? Well, as Scott from MarketingPilgrim points out, that’s not exactly the case. Apparently if you’d like a PR7 link from Google, it will cost you a mere $1,995. To make the offer even more appealing, they’ll throw in a Google Mini as well! Now that’s what I call a bargain.

Want to see a list of all the websites that are, along with Google of course, currently in violation of Google’s newly updated Webmaster Guidelines? No problem, Google’s provided it for you.

As if that weren’t enough, Google’s also breaking their own Design and Quality Guidelines. Hey, I mean if you’re gonna go, go all out right? As you can see, Google clearly states that “If the site map is larger than 100 or so links, you may want to break the site map into separate pages.” Now, I’m no mathematician, but even I know that page has more than 100 or so links.

So, will Google deindex themsevles? Will they remove all the offending sites that have been caught red handed? I wouldn’t hold my breath.

Posted in Google by Skitzzo

Is Google Page Rank (PR) the be all

May 26, 2007   //   by freshtraffic   //   Google, keyword, pagerank  //  Comments Off

You hear it all the time on the net from some very good sources, but is Googles PR (Page Ranking) all that is made of it?

The reason I ask myself this question is, I know sites that have been at the top of Google, Yahoo, MSN search engines for the last 5 years and these sites only have a Google PR2 ranking, yet are on the first page for keywords and phrases that have over 40 million listed pages.

The content is good and relevant, the keywords are meaningful with the correct density and none have high ranking PR pages back linking pages to them, so what is the secret?
By the way, one of these sites gets over 5 million hits per year worldwide.

While it is a never ending job for seo experts trying to work out the Algorithms of the search engines, it just may be that if you write a good website, with good content that is releveant, with correct titles and descriptions, you just may get the spot you require.

Answers on a post card please

What will be the Downfall of Google?

May 3, 2007   //   by freshtraffic   //   Google, internet news  //  Comments Off

Andrew Goodman was recently interviewed by Pandia Search Engine News. One of the things I like about the interview is his discussion about a way that Google could lost it’s stranglehold on the search market. It occurs during his discussion of the increasing focus on personalization by Google.

As Andrew notes “Done right, it’s a natural extension of what search ought to be”. But, there are real potential issues with privacy concerns as well. If it’s not done right, it could create a groundswell of concern that could be really damaging. People may become afraid to search, because their search history will be stored.

And this certainly could be a scenario that could hurt Google with this new initiative. However, I think the likelihood is pretty low – it’s just not a mistake that I think Google will make.

One way to look at a potential Google downfall is to look at recent past history. How did Microsoft lost it’s clear leadership of the technology market? By making their existing products, which are still incredibly important, less relevant. The focus shifted to search, and Microsoft did not get out there with it’s offerings quickly enough.

This is exactly what happened to the railroad companies in the US about a century ago. There is an old business school lesson about this – the railroad companies should have thought of themselves as “transportation companies”. If the railroad companies had thought of themselves in that light, they would have taken an active hand in the automobile revolution that did them in.

It repeated itself in a different way a couple of decades ago when the Japanese car manufacturers were stealing huge amounts of market share in the US auto market because every one was so concerned about gas mileage. While they remain a strong factor in the market, they lost all of their forward momentum, and the US auto manufacturers revived and became strong again.

What happened there? There is another business school lesson that covers this one – if the competitive playing field is stacked against you, change the playing field (or the rules of the game).

With companies as dominant as Microsoft was, and Google now is, changing the landscape is not something you can do by yourself. You need to wait for shifts in technology to happen, and this is something that could really take quite some time to happen. In other words, don’t hold your breath. The challenge for Google will be to remain very nimble, see the broader landscape at all times, and keep the natural arrogance of a market leader in check.

Your Entire Article Content Is Under Scrutiny From Google

Apr 14, 2007   //   by freshtraffic   //   Google, internet strategy, website principles  //  Comments Off

If you are writing articles for the purpose of off page SEO it is time to consider just how swiftly Googles algorithm is changing over a short period off time. We don’t need to concern ourselves too much with the other search engines at this time. You will have heard many times that unique content is King, and it still is, but you must also consider that contextual relevance is now Queen.

The whole way of thinking behind article content is being changed. Semantics, overall page theme, phrase matching, (comparisons with millions of other similar pages in their index to see if phrases are relevant to the topic / theme), and even the use of buzz or niche words – eg woodworkers, surfers, stamp collectors or whatever all have their own specialised words and phrases which would mean nothing to the rest of us. This is just a part of what Google will use to determine how important and relevant your article actually is to them.

This ongoing war between the guys who find a chink in Googles armour and then write software to exploit it will never stop. This is human nature. The thing is that these guys pushing their “latest, most powerful” scripts and PC applications have a good job for life. There are always millions of people who are quick enough to snap up their $97 products if there is a hint they can get to #1 without doing any work.

They have customers for life. As soon as Google addresses an issue then another script is on the market and so the loop continues. The sad thing is that the buyers of these scripts are spending so much time trying to be “smart” they probably never actually build a business.

A similar problem exists with the use of Private Label Rights articles. There is little wrong in principal with using PLR properly, they can give you some great ideas to get started, but the vast majority of users who have downloaded 1000 articles either free or for next to no cost simply load them up and fire them out onto the Net without even looking at them! This, together with spinning software is the cause for the incredible amount of useless and senseless junk on the Internet that Google is determined to deal with. And rightly so.

There is no doubt that the duplicate content issue is presently a huge cause for concern for Google. We all know that there was never any penalty imposed by Google for Duplicates. They simply ignored them. Weight being given to the oldest most relevant content.

It is unlikely that we shall see any penalty against duplicate content as it is quite reasonable to expect more than one version of an article on different websites. What we may see is penalties against what Google determines to be spun, low quality content with no relevance. I will not speculate on these penalties but we may have an issue on exactly what is determined to be sub standard content.

It would seem that the days of us “leading” Google into what our content is all about through the use of titles, keyword density, file names and so on is coming to end. Once the programming is in place it may well be that all we have to do is to write naturally with a certain amount of passion about a theme we have an interest in or have researched well. MMmmmm! Didn’t we use to do this before search engines and algorithms and programmers came on the scene?