Category Archives: iphone

Six Good Reasons Why You Might Want To Buy The New Apple iPhones

IPhone 6Apple finally launched its bigger iPhones this week as well as introducing the first new product in years called iWatch. Despite them being vanity products, there is a huge lure for consumers to get them!

1. These are the thinnest iPhones yet!

Apple calls the design of the new iPhones “a continuous, seamless design”. What it means is that the surface is texturally unbroken and the cover glass (“ion-strengthened, referring to a process in which a type of ion is exchanged for another to make the glass more durable) meets the anodized aluminium backing without tactile differentiation. With a thickness of 0.27 inches for the iPhone 6 and 0.28 for the iPhone 6 Plus, the two are the thinnest yet of all iPhones. But here’s the clincher: at 0.30 inches, the iPhone 5s is only fractionally thicker.

2. We’re also talking of an impressive display

The 4.7- and 5.5-inch displays of the two phones boast diagonal screens with “Retina HD” displays. And these displays come with notably higher resolution: 1334 by 750 pixels (326 pixels per inch, or over one million pixels, slightly higher than 720p) for the iPhone 6, and 1920 by 1080 pixels (401 pixels per inch, or over two million pixels, and native 1080p) for the iPhone 6 Plus. The new screens also have broader viewing angles, and both the phones have dramatically higher 1400:1 and 1300:1 contrast ratios, respectively, compared with the 4-inch 1136 by 640 pixels (326 pixels per inch) screen with 800:1 contrast ratio found on past models.

3. Of course, both are bigger too

The screens of both the phones make them bigger phones as well. 6.22 inches high by 3.06 inches wide (the iPhone 6 Plus) and 5.44 inches high by 2.64 inches wide (the iPhone 6), compared with the iPhone 5s’s 4.87 inches high by 2.31 inches wide.

4. Good news: both will have zippier processors

The A8 chip, Apple’s second-gen 64-bit offering with some 2 billion transistors, Apple says, sports up to “25% faster processing power and up to 50% faster graphics.” With these impressive numbers, rest assured that they’re better than some of the fastest phablets available currently.

5. Their batteries just got much better

The iPhone 6 Plus’ large battery, which Apple says lets it do up to 80 hours of audio (as compared to the 60 for the iPhone 5 and 50 for the iPhone 5s), 14 hours of video (11 and 10 for the iPhone 6 and 5s respectively), an hour or two more than the iPhone 6 and 5s when browsing over Wi-Fi, LTE and 3G, up to 24 hours of talk time over 3G (versus 14 and 10 for the iPhone 6 and 5s respectively) and 16 days of standby (versus just 10 days for both the iPhone 6 and 5s). Now these are definitely impressive numbers we’re talking.

6. All hail the new cameras!

The cameras of both the phones are perhaps the coolest sounding improvements. The 1080p iSight camera in both phones is still 8MP with 1.5µ pixels and ƒ/2.2 aperture (like the iPhone 5s’s), but includes a new sensor that supports an autofocus-enhancing feature called “Focus Pixels”. It is the same as the ones we find in high-end DSLR cameras. Apple says that the autofocus in them is faster, and continuous (a great thing for video). With improved local tone mapping and noise reduction, you can shoot video at 30 or 60 FPS, and take slo-mo video at both 120 and 240 FPS. The cameras also include video stabilisation (the Plus includes optical as opposed to digital image stabilisation, meaning the lens moves to compensate for shaking), and the new phones can identify faces (and blinking, and smiling) more efficiently whether close up or further away.

And… now your panorama shots can be up to a whopping 43 pixels now.

The still-720p, 1.2 megapixel FaceTime camera has been upgraded, too, with a new sensor and larger ƒ/2.2 aperture, bringing it up to par with the iSight in that regard. It can also do automatic high dynamic range in videos (the iPhone 5s only supports this in photo mode) and has a “burst” mode, which Apple says will let you take up to 10 photos a second.

The Google Worm

An interesting little theory for the New Year from Forbes: Apple is being eaten away inside by Google.

The Google Worm
The Google Worm

Call it “the worm strategy”—because Google is attacking Apple from the inside out.Over the past six months, Google has begun to systematically replace core, Apple-made iOS apps with Google-made iOS apps.

And this leads to a world where? Well there’s Android users, surrounded by Google search, and there are iPhone users, downloading Google apps—all of which make Google search a prominent feature. Interesting Yes?

However Google faces exactly the same problem that everyone else does: how do you monetize mobile? This is something that no one has managed to worked out as yet:

The key driver is that mobile CPMs are only 15 percent of desktop CPMs. As traffic migrates, seven ads on mobile bring the same revenue as one on the desktop, not good, because the lower CPMs coincide with lower click-through rates. With me so far?

Arrr

The problem is traffic is flooding from desktop to mobile and no one has yet really worked out how to make good money from mobile traffic. And there’s no certainty at all, although a good bet would be that if there is a solution to be found, that it will be Google that finds it, in the same way they did with AdWords for Web 1.0. ( I knew that would come back to haunt me one day) did they find it? or was it nicked from Overture, that’s another story.

Anyways gaining great chunks of iOS traffic through apps is just great, but that traffic still has to be monetised, so get working on ideas my friends, there’s money to be made here.

 

Is Siri a Metaphor That could Define The Future Of Local Search?

This is not a tribute to Steve Jobs directly. Although in the end it may be one of his greatest legacies.

I have been in the technology field for over 30 years. I have seen a number of radical changes that became metaphors for how things were supposed to be done. Many, but certainly not all, of these metaphors were created at the hands of Steve Jobs.

QWERTY defined the keyboard. The Apple II defined a generation of PCs. Sony defined what the home video recorder should be. The Mac defined what a Window and Window based programs should behave like. The iPhone defined how touch functions on a smartphone and what a smartphone is.

These defining products and the companies that produce them don’t always win the battle in the market place for various reasons but the idea sticks. The technology becomes iconic and lays the path for others to follow. Sometimes the followers overtake the creators, sometimes the creators win. The market is a brutal overseer.

Siri, the natural language interface for the new iPhone 4s, is one such product. It may not be the product that wins the battle in the market place, it may not be the specific product feature that everybody has to have in their pockets in 2015 but if it isn’t, whatever is there will be like Siri.

Imagine a world where you say to your phone: Find me the best Asian restaurant within 25 miles. Or: Text my wife to meet me at 21. Or: Schedule an appointment for me with Joe the PR Guy and send him a text. Or: Tell my friends on Facebook that our team won!

All of the sudden the only thing that matters is the answer. Nothing else. You won’t be looking at a search box, you won’t be landing on someone’s home page, you won’t be looking at an ad…In fact you won’t be looking at anything.

You won’t need to. Not all of your interaction will be voice driven but depending on your mobile needs a large portion of it could be. You no longer need to look at your phone to enter a query in a search box. You just ask for the answer and it will just give it to you.

The answer can come from a single source or a range of sources. The brand of search engine is no longer important, the brand of phone that you are asking the question on is. Your only relationship is with the phone. Either it works or it doesn’t. Search engines and web brands could potentially fade in importance.

The winner in this next interface battle gets to pick where and who it gets the answer from. If it needs three data sources, it uses three data sources. If it needs four, it looks at four. That complexity is all hidden and the user not only doesn’t need to visit multiple websites, the user doesn’t even need a special app. Siri, or something like it, becomes the great equalizer for data sources. An OS for voice as it were. It handles the complexities. You just need to ask it.

Will it do what Apple says it will? There was a time when you couldn’t trust what Apple or any technology firm said. You had to have it proven to you. Even though this is a new Apple, one molded by the demanding perfectionism of Steve Jobs, this is one of those times when you will need to know that the natural language interface works and it works seamlessly.

If it does, it becomes THE WAY that you want to interact with the device. The new QWERTY as it were. Maybe not all all the time but certainly with mobile search and more frequently than not with mobile local search.

It also become the great disintermediator in mobile. It may be the greatest disintermediator of all time. If it works.

http://blumenthals.com/blog/