Category Archives: social network

The New Social Search – BingBook?

There was the big conference today from Microsoft Bing and Facebook, and from the sounds of things they’re trying to give the world of search a stiff shake. The partnership idea that’s been rolled out (very small snippet) is when you search for an item or topic on Bing, your socially relevant searches would appear first. Your friends likes/dislikes on a subject or topic that you’ve plugged in. Some good questions have been asked from the conference, items of privacy of course what with Facebooks infamous history thus far, and of course someone asked about the money incentive (no answer on that last one). The far reaching goal is that your search is tailored exclusively for you. It’s personalization of the SERPs for *everyone* who uses Bing.

About the privacy factor, the social search angle is functioning like a module within Bing. A module, which can be turned off should you choose to shut it.

Zuckerberg stated : “We have this idea. 500 million people can look you up on Facebook. We think why shouldn’t applications be able to do this to?”

Because everyone is searchable on Facebook, set to private or not, the train of thought is to allow applications the same level of trust. Bascially you’re allowing Bing, to see all of your informationg you’ve made public on Facebook, and makes that information searchable to your friends list.

The social search angle isn’t meant to completely remove the traditional SERPs page you’re accustomed to seeing, it’s being added to help personalize your queries and provide you with unique results, relevant to you. It’s an updated twist on the personalized search results you start to see within Google for example, minus the cookie saving sessions. The negative side I personally see at this juncture, would be the fact that you need to Opt-out of the service should you choose not to use it. Some would think Facebook learned their opt-in, opt-out lessons by now. Only time now will be the determining factor on this new idea.

Google’s Social Circle Growing

With their sink or swim approach to business, Google Wave has crashed. At the end of the year, Wave will be dismantled, some portions being retained and used in current and future apps. Wave was an innovation in collaberation, which was great once you got the hang of it. Intuitive however, it was not. To work with, and discover Wave’s nuances you had to keep at it, and learn as you work with your friends and colleagues.

Meanwhile, on the hands free end of the news, smartphones running the Android platform has reached the point of 200,000 activations per day. The conservative estimate is that as we approach the end of the year, it’ll be nearing the 30 million Androids in the public.
In a Nielson poll, Android based phones outsold the iPhone so far in 2010 (July outstanding), 27% for the Android versus 23% for the Apple iPhone. Loyalty may become a problem however, as iPhone users are happiest with their handsets (despite the antenna woes), with only 71% of Android owners and users being content enough to continue to use and upgrade their handset.

The ball may remain in Android’s court however, as with the platform being open source, any smartphone manufacturer can build and provide a phone that uses the software.

In the news to come column, Google has inked a deal to purchase Slide, a social app developer. Expected to be announced on Friday, this would mark a second large step in the social avenue of the web, along with Googles previous investment of more than $100 million into social gaming company Zynga.

Eric E. Schmidt, Google’s chief executive, said that social networking was important to Google:

“Search is going to get better with more social information.”

“We have understood for a long time that social stuff is very important. The question that’s in everyone’s minds is why are we trying to create a competitor to Facebook, and the answer is we’re not going to create a competitor to Facebook. It’s something different.

“It’s hard to see how we could end up as becoming a significant gaming or entertainment source,” he said. “It’s much more likely that we would become an infrastructure for those sorts of things.”

Local Social Media – The Webs Future

Social networking is the new kid on the internet block, with Facebook being the most obvious example of it’s popularity, it won’t be going anywhere soon. Full of games, groups, and social calendars, employers and businesses often block the websites access as it erodes their employees productivity. Users often get spam wall postings from friends who play the games like Mafia Wars or Farmville, and a general malcontent seems to be evident about such, until people are shown how to block the messages.

But is it all bad? A recent survey by Pew and Elon found that:

85% of nearly a thousand techies agreed, the social benefits of Facebook, Twitter, etc, will outweigh the negatives over the coming decade. E-mail, instant messaging, social networking, and similar Web services offer simple ways to forge and rediscover social ties that can make a difference in people’s lives.

So all the spam, time lost, and invites from long lost relatives, being sociable on the internet isn’t a bad thing. The larger agreement between the panel was that the social interaction created by the internet, and the services available, has enriched their life currently, and can be seen to help encourage this growth. It may sound like it’s a too good to be true scenario, but if you begin as a business, to think of it only in cost investment first; all of the social networks are free to join and use. Facebook, LinkedIn, MySpace, Google Buzz and apps, all quick to join, setup, and share your information with those you invite to share with.

Of course there’s the downside mentioned earlier. Time wasted on sites, not to mention the stigma of lost face to face interaction, and the recent privacy concerns of some sites. But Pew and Elon didn’t select their panel from random passing people from the public. They used the social services to reach their findings. E-mail, Facebook, Twitter, and blogs were all tapped for their answers and opinions. Clay Shirky, Esther Dyson, Nicholas Carr, Craigslist Founder Craig Newmark were only a few of the people who provided their feedback.

Newmark: “The Net is about people connecting online, for commerce, politics, and personally, and we already see that enhances real-life relationships. Location-based social networking, in particular, will be a big part of our lives.

As large as the world is, as diverse as the population seems. The more people discover about themselves, the more they wish to build, and form relationships around themselves locally. Local social media networking looks to be the way forward.

Winnipeg Gets it's own Social Media Website

Winnipeggers will now have a chance to meet and socialize, buy & sell, blog and chat on there very own city social network.


Winnipeg, Canada, March 17, 2010 –(PR.com)– The website called www.winnipeggers.ca has launched the beta test version for the next few weeks to provide Winnipeggers a chance to shape the website as they want it. The site is unique in that it provides all the functions of a social media website like Facebook, with the convenience of easy access to information about Winnipeg. cont

The Locally Sociable Web

On the web, there are billions upon billions of webpages and websites. Any topic or category you can think of, it exists online for you to read and learn about. Thankfully, we have search engines like Google, Bing, and Yahoo to name a couple, which can search, index, catalog and categorize all of these sites. Otherwise it would be like a giant pile of leaves, with little to differentiate them from one another.

And yet, as the world expands online, as information becomes more and more accessible, businesses and surfers are finding themselves pulled increasingly in a rather surprising direction. The more available the world has become, the closer to home users have gone. With the boom of social media, the world has started to realize just how small a place it really is. When with a few keystrokes, you can be browsing art galleries at the Louvre, or taking in the pyramids at Giza, the trend of online activity has been shifting more and more to a local focus. The search engines have noticed as well, and have begun to lend more importance to geo-targeting search results for terms. People post on Twitter and Facebook about which local pizza joint has the best crust, or look for a plumber from their friends referrals.

Smartphones, PDA’s laptops and netbooks. It’s getting easier to be online, and faster to navigate what you’re looking for. Social media brings the real time world to your finger tips, and the trend is getting ready to shift again. What’s the next big step?

Not-So-Banner Year for Digital Part 2

Social measures up

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s prediction that media would forever change with the advent of the popular social network’s ad platform is rightly ridiculed. Yet while advertisers have few success stories on sites like Facebook, the growth of the social Web is impossible to ignore. Facebook now adds a new user every seven seconds.

For all its growth and hype, social media has been unforgiving terrain for marketers. Their efforts to date have been decidedly experimental, consisting of sponsorships, ad placements or brand applications that have proven ineffective. “Whenever you try to apply a standard ad model to a social dynamic, it’s like oil and water,” said Sean Finnegan, chief digital officer at Starcom MediaVest Group.

Instead, look for marketers to weave social programs throughout their marketing, using free tools to monitor their brand health and respond to customer needs. Comcast, a brand with no shortage of detractors, has scored a rare win with customers by dedicating an employee to handle customer problems on micro-blogging network Twitter. Expect more brands to follow suit, not just on Twitter but throughout the social Web of blogs and other two-way media.

“The best way is to dig in and monitor what people are saying,” said Noah Brier, head of strategy at digital marketing firm Barbarian Group. “It can only help you.”