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Yahoo-Microsoft deal

Jul 30, 2009   //   by freshtraffic   //   bing, microsoft, yahoo  //  Comments Off

Yahoo has agreed to use Microsoft’s search engine, Bing, on its Internet sites in return for 88 percent of the revenue from search ads for the first half of the 10-year deal announced on Wednesday. The deal is expected to be completed early next year.

Yahoo and Microsoft in their announcement said their agreement will provide more choices for consumers and advertisers, but they expect it will be “closely reviewed by the industry and government regulators.”

That’s because Yahoo and Microsoft together may increase search competition. Google has a 65 percent share of the U.S. Internet search market, according to research firm comScore in June, while Microsoft had 8.4 percent of searches and Yahoo had about 20 percent.

Does Bing have enough bling?

Jun 22, 2009   //   by freshtraffic   //   bing, Google, microsoft, search, yahoo  //  Comments Off

For years, Microsoft has been struggling to chip away at Google’s dominance in the search engine market. And for years, they have been largely unsuccessful, mainly because their own search engine, Microsoft Live Search, produced unwanted and often irrelevant results.

But a few weeks ago, Microsoft released Bing, an updated version of Live Search, in their newest attempt to knock Google off its pedestal.

Although Bing is partially a rebranding of Live Search, it does include new features like instant previews of Web sites and videos.

Microsoft is so committed to Bing’s success that it will launch an astronomical $80 million to $100 million advertising campaign. That’s more than four times Google’s entire advertising budget last year.

It’s been hard to determine how Microsoft’s newcomer is stacking up against its two greatest competitors, Google and Yahoo!. According to StatCounter, one of the world’s largest Web analytics companies, Bing temporarily overtook Yahoo! in terms of market share. Currently, however, Google has 81.5 percent of the search engine market, with Yahoo! at 9.39 percent and Bing at 4.82 percent.

But one Microsoft employee, Michael Kordahi, thinks that some users might be prejudiced against Bing because of Google’s perceived brand name superiority.

He created a blind search engine that shows the search results of Google, Yahoo! and Bing in three nondescript columns. The Web site then invites users to vote for the most relevant results.

Unfortunately, the results were too erratic to name any consistent winner, prompting Kordahi to conclude that “some douche is gaming the system.”

I must confess that, as someone who has had bad experiences with Live Search, I prefer Google. Before I could adequately review the usefulness of Bing, I thought I should first experiment with the blind search engine myself.

So, in completely unscientific fashion, I typed in ten random searches – five single words and five phrases – and picked the results I thought were most valuable and applicable.

And the results were somewhat surprising: While Google crushed the competition with six votes, Bing received a surprising three votes, and Yahoo! just one vote.

It seems I find Microsoft’s search engine a fairly legitimate contender in the battle for supremacy, although Google is still the undisputed champion.

But how do Bing’s other search capabilities like News and Maps compare against Google’s?

Well, I certainly found that the Bing homepage looks pretty. The search bar is superimposed on a beautiful panoramic stock photo that changes every day. Each picture is embedded with invisible squares about the picture that users can click on for more information.

But while this design is certainly unique, Bing’s hide-and-go-seek feature is basically self-promotion masquerading as helpful innovation.

Each square merely redirects users to a search through Bing. For example, clicking on “Learn more about Flag Day” directs the user to a Bing search of “Flag Day.”

But Bing does have some helpful, interesting features.

Unlike Google, Bing’s image search displays the results in one giant scrollable window, thereby eliminating the annoying need to click on multiple pages. And Bing Cashback offers buyers to receive a small percentage back of payments they have made on participating Web sites.

These are Bing’s best features, however, and ultimately Bing still plays second fiddle.

Bing News lacks all the customizability, readability and wealth of information that exists in Google News. Bing only features 14 translatable languages to Google’s 41.

And while Bing Maps is speckled with aesthetically pleasing mountains and forests, it cannot easily display directions and locations like Google Maps.

We must remember, though, while developers have made significant blunders along the way, Bing is still being improved.

They failed to realize, for example, that Bing can mean “sickness” in Chinese (the nationality of Bing’s biggest audience), prompted a name change to “Biying,” meaning “must respond,” which Microsoft is coyly marketing as a “decision engine.”

And they received criticism when Bing’s filtering mechanism could not adequately block porn in its parental settings, which was quickly rectified when the company consulted 25 security vendors for assistance.

Microsoft is certainly improving its image as a legitimate search engine competitor. But the company needs much more innovative firepower before successfully waging war against the Google Empire.

Search Marketing Spend up 11% in UK

Jan 30, 2009   //   by freshtraffic   //   Google, microsoft, search marketing, UK, yahoo  //  Comments Off

The UK’s search engine marketing spend grew 11% year on year during the fourth quarter of 2008, according to a report.

Search spend increased by 14% between the third quarter and fourth quarter of 2008, according to a Search Engine Performance Report.

This reflects the trend for consumers and marketers to increase online activity during the busy Christmas trading period.

Google grew its overall UK market share from 82.6% to 88.2% year on year, largely as a result of its Google Content network which grew by 300% year on year.

The increase in market share by Google was in part at Yahoo!’s expense. Its market share dropped from 13.9% to 8.4% year on year.

Microsoft Live Search was able to maintain its presence in the UK market at 3.4% market share.

The increased level of search spend during Q4 can be in large part attributed to the strength of the online retail channel in price comparison and shopping efficiency, particularly for more established online brands who increased spend to reach revenue goals.

Yahoo joining Internet with TV

Jan 20, 2009   //   by freshtraffic   //   internet, optimized, TV, yahoo  //  Comments Off

The Internet and the television have circled each other for years, but the timing was never right for them to form a serious relationship.

Now with Yahoo playing matchmaker, their union promises to flower in a big way.

The Sunnyvale Web portal, with the help of Intel, made one of the bigger splashes at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas earlier this month with the full unveiling of its Yahoo Widget Channel, a new platform for Internet content that will be embedded in TVs from a number of major manufacturers.

The initiative takes the flirtation that companies like Sony and Samsung have had with watching Internet content on the TV and gives it a profound boost, helping users consume a robust version of the Web through one of their most beloved consumer electronics devices.

Sony, Samsung, LG, Toshiba and Vizio have announced plans to deploy the channel on upcoming Internet-connected TVs starting this spring. Their TVs will feature at least 20 TV-optimized widgets or applications including MySpace, eBay, YouTube, CBS and – of course – a number of Yahoo properties like Yahoo News, Weather, Video, Finance and Flickr.

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