Google, indexing the world 1 page at a time.

Google has stepped up it’s bid in the quest to own the web, GoogleDNS is here. DNS servers are, in many respects, the backbone of the Internet. DNS allows you to type a domain name like www.senate.gov into a browser instead of a machine-readable IP number like http://156.33.195.33/. Google DNS will allow users to bypass their ISPs Domain Name Servers (DNS).

Google, being a huge ally in the war for net neutrality, makes throwing it’s hat into the DNS ring a bold move. Just like all software, hardware, or inteernet company, the bigger the concern, the harsher the scrutiny. The hand waving and doomsday prophesizing about Googles cloud computing capabilities anytime they have a hiccup being an example.

That being said, Google has made a couple of promises in regards to GoogleDNS. Google’s FAQ states they will only keep temporary logs and erase all the information it collects through the public DNS service within 24 to 45 hours. The company promises not to keep any information that is linked to IP addresses in its permanent logs. Just providing another option out there for those inclined to give it a swing.

Knowing the web, is about power. Those who know most, have the most power, and adding this feather in the Google cap, is just another tool in a wide assortment of available information collectors. As it stands now, who really knows the web better than Google?

One interesting.. concession that Google makes however:

..because nameservers geolocate according to the resolver’s IP address rather than the user’s, Google Public DNS has the same limitations as other open DNS services: that is, the server to which a user is referred might be farther away than one to which a local DNS provider would have referred. This could cause a slower browsing experience for certain sites.

In easy read, depending on where you are, your internet might actually get slower by using GoogleDNS, not faster.