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Online Privacy – And The Fallacy It Exists

Feb 10, 2012   //   by freshtraffic   //   facebook, Google, internet, internet news  //  Comments Off

The amount of noise being made over Googles new privacy policy, set to come into play in March, is starting to reach a fevered pitch. The most recent noise maker, the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC) has filed a lawsuit against the FTC in regards to said changes.

Google has come out and admitted they’re making a singular privacy policy which will encompass all of it’s online properties. Google, Gmail, Youtube, Calendar etc, instead of the dozens it currently has active. If you really wanted to take the time to do it, you could click through and read each and every one of those privacy policies, and on the whole you would find they’re all fundamentally the same. But with updating their policy to encompass all of their online services, it makes it simpler for a user to know what information is collected, how it’s collected and when. And if you’re really that paranoid, you don’t even need a Google account to use their services, nor do you need to remain signed in. It isn’t as big of an issue as it’s being made out to be, but everyone has an opinion and everyone has the right to air it.

All of the issues being brought up surrounding the new privacy policy, are somewhat reminiscent of the privacy issues that Facebook seems to have every few months. But the social network which just recently went public, is used for so much more than just data collection. Facebooks targeted ad system is a very good tool, for small businesses looking for local exposure especially, just because of how its ad delivery system works. But, because the network has also aligned itself with government agencies, your information is more accessible than you know. Thinking of smudging the numbers on your tax return? The IRS has unfettered access to search your personal accounts in case something doesn’t add up on their end. Potential employers are starting to add a field for your Facebook profile on your job application, so they can have access to see if you’re truly company material. Even credit companies are getting in on the act, and reducing, or declining credit based simply on where you live, where you shop, or where you travel. Not because of your past history, but because of who you are. And people are getting fussy with Google’s privacy policy?

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